Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for March, 2007

Jerome Groopman on The Colbert Report

On Friday I wrote about Jerome Groopman’s book How Doctors Think.  On Monday Dr. Groopman appeared on the Colbert Report (you can view the clip here).

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Family MDs and Technology

Last month’s Wall Street Journal (“Faltering Family MDs get Technology Lifeline“) has an interesting article about how small-practice physicians are using technology as a weapon against the economies of scale which physicians working for large-scale practices enjoy. The article tells the story of Dr. Gordon Moore. When he worked at a large, hospital-owned medical practice, […]

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2010 Census Short-form

If you think creating a survey which will compel respondents to answer in an unbiased manner is easy, check out this article originally published in the Wall Street Journal in February (“Census 2010 plays six not-so-easy questions“). The six questions proposed to be asked in 2010 Census short-form questionnaire are as follows: Name of person […]

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Shriner Hospital Corruption

Approximately one year ago today, I wrote about whether or not non-profit hospitals should be tax exempt (“Should Non-Profit Hospitals get a Tax Break?“). Generally, I concluded that they should not. Flash forward to March 2007 and we see that The New York Times has an article titled “In Shriner Spending, A Blurry Line of […]

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Exploring the Role of Internet Advertising in American Politics

Chris Weber is a PhD candidate in Political Science at Stony Brook University. Currently he is conducting a survey on Interet advertising and American politics. “This survey is designed to help us understand what Americans like you think about internet advertising, modern campaigns, and politics. As part of a larger national project, your participation will […]

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How Doctors Think

This week on NPR’s “Fresh Air” radio program is an interesting interview with Dr. Jerome Groopman. Dr. Groopman has recently written a book titled How Doctors Think. The interview is available at the NPR website, but below I have a brief excerpt from the book. “This book is about what goes on in a doctor’s […]

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March Madness

It’s the first day of “March Madness” and already my alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania, has been bounced from the tournament.  If you’re looking for an interesting article about how you should choose your NCAA tournament bracket for next year, check out the N.Y. Times article “Top Seeds can often mislead in NCAA bracket.”

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Dynamic Analysis of Market Shares and Health Insurance Choice

Consumer-directed health plans (CDHP) have been a topic of much interest in the United States of late. In order to increase competition between health plans, in 1996 the German government began a program to allow consumers to have a free choice of their social health insurers plan. Since the federal government sets a high minimum […]

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What determines differences in public goods provision?

A 2007 NBER working paper by Banerjee, Iyer and Somanathan presents the following facts: “In Nepal, access to schools is ten times better in the best districts compared to the worst. For Kenyan provinces, this ratio is 8:1; it is more than 2:1 for both Indian states and Russian regions and slightly over 1.5:1 for […]

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Cavalcade of Risk #21

This week’s edition of the Cavalcade of Risk is up at MSSP Nexus Blog. 

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