Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for August, 2008

Book Review: Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic

I recently finished reading Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic by Leonard Berry and Kent Seltman. The book provides a glimpse inside one of the most successful health care organizations. While the book illuminates how Mayo Clinic has solved many of its operational issues and how it has built its reputation, the book is overwhelmingly positive. […]

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Cavalcade of Risk is up

The latest edition of the Cavalcade of Risk is up at Healthcare Manumission.

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Buying food more frequently leads to healthier eating habits

A Health Economics paper by Timothy K. M. Beatty finds that “households who make more frequent, smaller food purchases buy healthier foods than households who make fewer, larger purchases. These households are more likely to purchase foods with a lower share of total calories from fats, saturated fats and a larger share of calories from […]

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Fewer Americans were uninsured in 2007

According to the U.S. Census: Both the percentage and number of people without health insurance decreased in 2007. The percentage without health insurance was 15.3 percent in 2007, down from 15.8 percent in 2006, and the number of uninsured was 45.7 million, down from 47.0 million. The percentage of people covered by private health insurance […]

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Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis in Russia

Merrill Goozner writes about MDR-TB in Russia in a four-part feature article in Scientific American.

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Why Charles Barkley is healthy

The New York Times writes that its “Better to Be Fat and Fit Than Skinny and Unfit.”

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Risk Aversion in the Laboratory

Many experimental economists have been interested in measuring the level of risk aversion as well as the determinants of risk aversion. These studies often take place in a controlled, laboratory setting and designing an experiment which will elicit responses which are true to life is essential. In “Risk Aversion in the Laboratory,” Harrison and Rutström […]

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Should low quality hopsitals be given more or less money?

Recently, the San Diego Union Tribune reported that the Sharp Grossmont Hospital in eastern San Diego county was cited for a number of preventable deaths. Reporter Cherl Clark found numerous problems, which included: “staff members restraining a highly medicated, 25-year-old man with schizophrenia in such a way that he was allowed to suffocate. In addition, […]

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Olympic Post V: Inspiration

The most inspirational television advertisement of the Olympics (and a longer YouTube video).

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What to say in economics seminars

Justin Wolfers writes in the Freakonomics blog that economists should limit their objections during academic seminars to a list of comments to make discussions of research papers more efficient. Here are some of my favorite: Adam Smith said that. Unfortunately, there is an identification problem which is not dealt with adequately in the paper. The […]

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