Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for April, 2009

BaseCase

Let’s say that you’re interested in running a Markov model, but are not mathematically savvy.  Gijs Hubben has come up with a solution in his Basecase website.  The online software allows you to customize the drug costs, medical assessment and procedure costs associated with the disease.  If available, you can use other academic models as […]

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Swine Flu Update: Thursday

U.S. School Closures, Online Learning Fort Worth closes Schools.   Nearly 300 schools close. October 2006: Ohio proposes online learning as  a substitute for classroom learning during a flu pandemic.  Did these proposals actually get implemented? San Mateo County poses using the website Moodle for online learning during flu pandemics. Marketplace, however, says that the […]

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The Economics of Free Surgical Masks

El Universal reports that Mexican police have arrested 13 individuals accused of selling surgical masks on the street.  Should the government arrest individuals selling surgical masks? Any capitalist would in general support the ability of individuals to trade cash for the goods they desire.  However, the case of the surgical mask may be different.  Surgical […]

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Should health care providers be compelled to work during declared public health emergencies?

Carl Coleman say no.   Working during a pandemic is a supererogatory behavior — i.e., acts that are commendable if done voluntarily, but that go beyond what is expected.  Coleman argues that “…while health care professionals can legitimately be sanctioned for violating voluntarily-assumed employment or contractual agreements, they should not be compelled to assume life-threatening risks […]

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Latest HWR is posted

The latest edition of the Health Wonk Review is up at Health Care Policy and Marketplace Review.

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Calculating Optimal Trial Sample Sizes: EVSI

Chapter 7 of Decision Modelling for Health Economic Evaluation looks at the calculating the Expected Value of Sample Information (EVSI).  In particular, EVSI can answer the question of optimal sample sizes. The Wrong Way How do scientists currently decide on sample sizes?  Often they will do one of the following: “(i) estimate potential grant funding […]

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The web works for porn, not for science?

Marketplace discusses whether or not NIH funded studies should be make available for free. Duke University law professor James Boyle: “The Web works great for porn or for shoes, or for flirting on social networks. But it doesn’t work really well for science. We haven’t done for science what we did on the rest of […]

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Swine Flu Update: Wednesday

U.S. has its first swine flu death. “The L.A. coroner’s office said this afternoon that further testing indicated neither of two flu-related deaths being investigated in Los Angeles County appeared to be linked to the swine flu.” – L.A. Times. Slate has a great article which answers the question “Why does the swine flu seem to be […]

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Expected Value of Perfect Information

You have just done a study comparing the cost-effectiveness of drug A and drug B.  Should you just rest on these laurels or is further research on drug B warranted.  Decision Modelling for Health Economic Evaluation claims that there are 3 criteria that should determine whether or not you decide to collect more information: The […]

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Swine Flu Update: Tuesday

Where has the swine flu been detected?   A map of the H1N1 Swine Flu lists all confirmed, unconfirmed, and negative cases of the swine flu around the world. Mexico City has decided to close all restaurants in the capital, only allowing them to serve food ‘to go.’    Restaurant associations are asking for the restaurant ban to be lifted. […]

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