Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for October, 2009

To Boo or Not to Boo

Sunday marks a historic day…Brett Favre returns to Lambeau Field.  Many Packers fans are conflicted about whether or not to boo the legend.   Former Packer LeRoy Bulter advises: “But if you’re going to stand up wearing Packer clothing or a Packer uniform and cheer when Brett Favre comes out, you should bring a bag […]

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Why Environmentalists should NOT support Organic Farming

Currently, organic farming supplies less than 3% of America’s food, but this figure is on the rise.  Does organic farming provide a “sustainable” of how to grow food in the next millennium?   Paul Roberts thinks not.  Eliminating chemical fertilizers and pesticides would reduce crop yields.  Thus, the amount of additional farmland that would be needed […]

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Urban Institute: Reform Plan’s affect on the Number Uninsured in the U.S.

Currently there are about 45 million uninsured individuals in the United States.  The Urban Institute predicts would happen to the number of individuals uninsured under the following of reforms. Expand Medicaid to individuals with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty line (FPL): 17 million uninsured would receive insurance Provide subsidies to individuals […]

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Mid-week Links

How horrible is Medicare? Water issues in California. An individual mandate makes you worse off. iPhone app helps docs detect heart murmurs. Calculate how much out-of-network medical care will cost you?

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Tips on Patient Care

In an article called “That Loving Feeling,”  Judy Capko gives some tips for providers on how to treat patients.  Some gems include: “A sign in sheet is an excuse to ignore patients.” Nurses and receptionists need to introduce themselves.  Otherwise, patients just feel if they are another name in the schedule. Ambience makes a difference. […]

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“Health care, at any level, cannot be equated in dollars and cents.”

Dr. Bruce Douglas’s perspective on taking money out of health care: “Health care is a ‘service,’ provided by health care practitioners, that does not belong in the competitive, so-called free enterprise marketplace. Of course, doctors have to be paid, but the payment should not come directly from the patient. Reception areas in doctors’ offices should be […]

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Swine Flu Emergency Declared

As I predicted, the H1N1 influenza virus has returned to the U.S. this fall.  FluTracker gives a visual representation of the spread of the disease.   In response to the spread of H1N1, President Obama declared the H1N1 outbreak a national emergency.  The declaration will  ”allow a hospital to set up a make-shift satellite facility […]

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Links

Public option?  More competition?  Health care costs go up not matter what.  A history of Group Health Cooperative. Why the cost of lab tests is cheaper in Germany than in France.  A Detailed Report on the Private Healthcare Services Market in Eastern Europe. Hedghog Health Insurance.

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Genetic Adverse Selection

“…individuals who carry the [Huntington Disease] genetic mutation are up to 5 times as likely as the general population to own long-term care insurance…relatively limited increases in genetic information may threaten the viability of private long-term care insurance.” Oster et al. (2009) “Genetic Adverse Selection: Evidence from Long-Term Care Insurance and Huntington Disease” NBER Working […]

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Why Public-Private Partnerships are attractive: Renegotiations

Public-Private partnerships (PPP) are becoming increasingly popular.  In Europe, the annual value of PPP is 22.9 billion Euros.  In the United States, where until recently PPPs played a smaller role than in many European countries, financing of transportation infrastructure via PPPs increased almost tenfold, on an annual basis, between 2006-2008 and the preceding decade (1996-2005). […]

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