Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for April, 2012

The Physician Banker

On Monday, the World Bank announced that its new president would be American Jim Yong Kim. Unlike previous World Bank Presidents, who typically have economics, finance or business backgrounds, Kim is a physician who built his reputation developing public health programs for poor countries. Not everyone likes the decision. A physician with a doctorate in anthropology, […]

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Cavalcade of Risk #155

The Healthcare Economist’s entry leads off this week’s edition of the Cavalcade of Risk.

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Tuesday Links

Another form of drug insurance. Brain tumor vaccine? The Uninsured in SE PA. How you raise prices matters. Do small businesses support increasing taxes on millionaires? Expanding role of PAs. ACA and HRSA.

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Providers for Underserved Populations: RHC and FQHC

What is an RHC? An FQHC? Using a research from Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), this post provides the answer. Rural Health Clinic (RHC) The Rural Health Clinics Act (P.L. 95-210) was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Carter in 1977. The goal of this Act was twofold. First, it encouraged […]

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What is an ISBN?

You may have seen on Amazon or near the UPC of your book an ISBN.  What is an ISBN?  Can it be any number?  Why does the Healthcare Economist care? Answers are provided below. What is an ISBN? According to Wikipedia: “The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier based […]

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The Wright Health Wonk Review

Brad Wright had posted A Masterful Edition of Health Wonk Review at his Wright on Health blog. Check it out, especially if you like golf.

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Why do insurance companies reject applicants rather than just raise their premiums?

As of 2011, in 45 out of 51 States (including DC) insurers can choose not to provide applicants with insurance coverage.  Requiring insurers to offer coverage to all individuals is known in insurance lingo as “guaranteed issue.” One question is why don’t insurance companies just charge high-risk individuals higher premiums?  Why would they want to […]

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Wednesday Links

Get a workout for your brain cells by reading these articles. Mandates vs. free-riders. Is income inequality really increasing? Drug-resistant malaria. Relative size of the ACA’s Medicaid expansion. Truth, Lies and Controversy. Where do people go when they drop out of the labor force? Why Mark Cuban is full of it.

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Health Claims Data Warehouse

The Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program provides employee health benefits are provided to civilian government employees.  In 2012, federal employees had a choice of 206 health plans. These plans include: 14 fee for service plans (10 available to all eligible federal employees and retirees and 4 open to employees in certain agencies); 164 HMO […]

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Physician Influence on Federal Health Spending, 1950s

The 1950s was a time of unprecedented technological advances in the science of medical care.  In 1955, epidemiologists at the University of Michigan developed a polio vaccine.  These advances lead the federal government to increase funding for research.  Between 1955 and 1960, Congress increased the budget of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from $81 million […]

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