Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for August, 2013

Mid-week Links

The Healthcare Economist is on hiatus for a week of vacation.  Enjoy these links to tide you over until the next post next week. Income elasticity for hospitals: quantity vs. quality Recessions and the demand for mental health drugs? Do smoking bans increase or decrease fires? Abuse in a hospital? Prescribing drugs not approved by […]

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Fixed vs. Random Effects in Meta-Analyses

What does fixed effects and random effects mean? For economists, fixed effects means The fixed effects model is a linear regression of y on x, that adds to the speci cation a series of indicator variables.  For example, one could include a series of country dummies in comparative time series cross-sectional data to account for unexplained […]

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Drug development is a very long process

Any new drug that you see released to the market probably started in a lab some 8 – 15 years ago….For every FDA-approved drug that makes it to market, 5000 to 10000 compounds were explored during the drug discovery phase. This is expected, what most companies optimize for is to have the failure occur as […]

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Friday Links

Is it too late to save AHRQ? Driving change in workers comp. Orange is the new green. Do brokers increase health insurance cost? Healthcare and the NBA.

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Why study health economics?

“And anyone interested in public policy or fiscal policy must, these days, be interested in health care economics.” Tyler Cowen, Marginal Revolution.

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Effective Sample Size

Consider the case where you have observations on the IQ of six individuals.  Let say that three of the individuals are from California and three are from Florida.  Assume the following data structure: California: 90, 110, 130 Florida: 95, 100, 120 In this case, the mean IQ nationally is 107.5, the variance of the sample […]

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CoR #190

Check out the  190th edition of the Cavalcade of Risk at My Personal Finance Journey.

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How does one measure the value of R&D?

Measuring the value of research and development (R&D) is a difficult problem.  Specifically, how does one measure the value of R&D on multifactor productivity (MFP).   At first glance, one would expect the value of R&D to be proportional to R&D spending in a given year.  However, this approach ignores that knowledge from previous years’ R&D […]

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7 Key P4P Research Questions

Why do physician practice patterns differ so much?  One cause of the regional variation the utilization of medical care is due to regional variation in patient health status.  Maynard, however, states that variation in patient health is not a primary cause of regional variation in the utilization of medical services.  He cites an article by […]

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Friday Links

The long view on health care. NPs vs. MDs in CA. Average care. The calculus of primary care. Are drug costs declining?

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