Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for May, 2015

Links to start the week

Cancer spending tops $100 billion. Impact of behavioral health on US longevity 1960-2010) $25 billion for antibiotic research. “You gotta change us to inpatient!” The King is dead.  Long live the King.

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FDA to Consider Patient Preferences

Typically, the FDA evaluates drugs and devices based on whether they are safe and effective. Patient treatment preferences play little to no role in whether a drug or device is approved by the FDA. However, times are a changing. On Wednesday, the FDA released draft guidance whereby they recommend the inclusion of patient preference information […]

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Some good news

The Ebola epidemic in Liberia has ended according to the WHO.  The NY Times reports: “The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Liberia is over,” the W.H.O. said in a statement read by Dr. Alex Gasasira, the group’s representative to Liberia, in a packed conference room at the emergency command center in Monrovia, the capital. […]

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Mid-Week Links

Behavioral economics and pricing. Nerd altruism. What do mangos and high fructose corn syrup have in common? Can homosexual men donate blood? “I went to the streets to find love.”

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Innovation vs. Equity in Health Care Philanthropy

In the Denver Post, Dottie Lamm makes discusses Larry Ellison’s hope to live forever and his donation towards anti-aging research.  Ellison has donated $450 million to anti-aging research. Ms. Lamm worries that this research will only benefit the rich. If such measures are available only to billionaires, or millionaires, or even to “one-percenters,” I see […]

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HWR at Medicare Resources Blog

Steve Anderson says the cat is out of the bag – he tapped into “a general vibe of grumpiness out there in the health policy blogosphere” posting The Grumpy Cat Edition of Health Wonk Review at his MedicareResources.org blog.

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What is the CPS?

The CPS is the Current Population Survey (CPS). This survey is administered by the Census and is one of the most widely used surveys in social science, particularly economics. A paper by Pascale et al. (2015) provides an overview of the survey and its quesitons related to health insurance: The CPS is a monthly labor […]

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Tuesday Links

How to write a resume (advice from da Vinci). Additional cost of ACA dependent care coverage. Marketing vs. Science. Faster drug reviews at the FDA? Mental health and the NFL draft.

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Dartmouth, France?

The Dartmouth Atlas is well known for examining regional variation in practice patterns in the U.S. It looks like researchers in France are taking a similar approach to evaluate their own single payer system. A paper by Mercier, Georgescu and Bousquet (2015) find: We assessed disparities in potentially avoidable hospitalizations in France in 2012 and […]

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