Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for November, 2017

Is Economics bogus science?

John Ioannidis has an interesting article in the L.A. Times titled “Economics isn’t a bogus science — we just don’t use it correctly.” Some excerpts are below: Most published studies use limited data. By a conservative estimate, the average study has 18% power to detect a modest association if one exists. Due to this low […]

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Why shopping for health insurance is hard

The premise is simple.  Create markets, let consumers choose the products that fit them best, and the competition will lead to higher quality and lower prices.  That is the premise behind the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance exchanges.  A necessary condition for this to work, however, is that patients have visibility into the quality and […]

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Physician use of “Choosing Wisely”

Choosing Wisely aims to identify low value services and advise physicians to avoid or at least be more conservative in the use of these services.  The ability to implement these changes, however, depends on physician awareness of these initiatives.  A paper by Colla and Mainor (2017) examines trends in awareness of the Choosing Wisely initiative: […]

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Friday Links

FDA defends Orphan Drug Act. AI can detect breast cancer. Smartphone doctors’ appointments. Changes in health care spending, 1996-2013. Study using data from verbal autopsies. Next day Rx. “End the Shenanigans”

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Is there peer-reviewer bias against research from low-income countries?

According to a paper from Harris et al. (2017), the country from which a study takes place greatly influences the academic community’s perception of that study.  The authors used a unique study design approach: In our randomized, controlled, and blinded crossover experiment, participants rated the same abstracts on two separate occasions, one month apart, with the […]

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Are PBM exclusion lists value-based?

Value-based insurance design (VBID) is a simple concept.  In short, interventions that provide high-value should be covered with little cost sharing; treatments with low-value should be covered with higher rates of cost sharing or in some cases perhaps not even covered at all. A paper by Cohen et al. (2017) aims to see how far […]

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Quotation of the day: Schumpeter on value

Nobody values bread according to the quantity of it which is to be found in his country or in the world, but everybody measures the utility of it according to the amount that he has himself… Schumpeter (1908)

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Advancing the Discussion on Real-World Evidence

With the FDA’s introduction of new guidelines surrounding the use of real-world evidence (RWE) in medical device regulatory decisions, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb advances the argument for the utility of RWE. In fact, the FDA is currently considering the role of RWE in evaluating pharmaceutical treatments. Despite much debate over what part RWE should play in […]

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Health Wonk Review: Quote-of-the-day Edition

It’s Health Wonk Review time!  We have some great posts lined up for today’s quotation-themed version of the Health Wonk Review.  We even have a few videos for your viewing pleasure.  Enjoy! “It’s the economy, stupid” – Bill Clinton How do factors like job loss, wage stagnation and low productivity affect the economy at large […]

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IVI releases its Open-Source Value Project

The Innovation and Value Initiative (IVI)–where I serve as the Director of Research–today released its first Open-Source Value Project in rheumatoid arthritis.  I have pasted the press release below.  Go check it out! Press release:  The Innovation and Value Initiative (IVI) – a collaboration of academics, patient advocacy organizations, payers, life sciences companies, providers, delivery systems, and other organizations dedicated to finding scientifically […]

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