Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for the 'Books' Category

History Repeating Itself.

“First, you push on your territories, where you have no business to be, and where you had promised not to go; secondly, your intrusion provokes resentment, and resentment means resistance.  Thirdly, you instantly cry out that the people are rebellious and their act is rebellion…Fourthly, you send out a force to stamp out rebellion; and […]

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Book Review: Priceless

I recently read a very interesting book by John Goodman titled “Priceless: Curing the Healthcare Crisis“. Whereas President Obama’s Health Reform plan focuses on increasing access to medical services by expanding the government’s role in the medical marketplace, Goodman advocates reducing regulation and adding flexibility to the health insurance and medical markets. The book is […]

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The Soviet Union and Plato’s Republic

“Baggy two-piece suits are not the obvious costume for philosopher kings: but that, in theory, was what the apparatchiks who rule the Soviet Union in the 1960s were supposed to be. Lenin’s state made the same bet that Plato had twenty-five centuries earlier, when he proposed that enlightened intelligence gives absolute powers would serve the […]

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NBA Coaches and Spoiled Children

In honor of the start of the NBA playoffs… “After personal fouls, points scored per minute have the largest impact on minutes per game.  The result directly contradicts the rhetoric from coaches.  Again, coaches tell players to focus on something besides scoring.  Players, though, can see that the most effective way to get more playing […]

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What is an ISBN?

You may have seen on Amazon or near the UPC of your book an ISBN.  What is an ISBN?  Can it be any number?  Why does the Healthcare Economist care? Answers are provided below. What is an ISBN? According to Wikipedia: “The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier based […]

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Physician Influence on Federal Health Spending, 1950s

The 1950s was a time of unprecedented technological advances in the science of medical care.  In 1955, epidemiologists at the University of Michigan developed a polio vaccine.  These advances lead the federal government to increase funding for research.  Between 1955 and 1960, Congress increased the budget of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from $81 million […]

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Quotation of the Day: On Wickedness

‘I’ll let you know as soon as I can, Danglars. I shall try to speak to Monsieur de Villefort and intercede with him on the prisoner’s behalf. I know that he is a rabid Royalist; but, dammit, though he’s a Royalist and a crown prosecutor, he is also a man and not, I believe, a […]

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Celebrity Product Endorsement in the 1800s

“The first customers bough pairs of telephones for communication point to point: between a factory and its business office, for example.  Queen Victory installed one at Windsor Castle and one at Buckingham Palace (fabricated in ivory; a gift from the savvy [Alexander Graham] Bell.” from The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood by James […]

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Bring Market Prices to Medicare

Medicare is a government-run insurance program.  Can policy changes be made to add competition to Medicare, maintain quality and reduce cost?  A book titled Bring Market Prices to Medicare argues that it can through a competitive bidding process. This book makes a number of sensible arguments which I review today. The main proposal of the […]

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The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction

I recently finished reading a great book by William Bynum called The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction. The book does just what it says: provides a great introduction to the history of medicine.  It is concise and interesting throughout.  The contents are divided into six chapters: Medicine at the bedside Medicine in the […]

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