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Archive for the 'Comparative Effectiveness' Category

The Voice of the Patient

Did you ever wonder what is is like having lung cancer?  Or narcolepsy?    What factors are most important to patients when receiving treatment for these diseases? The FDA is working to collect these answers to help guide their drug approval process.  The FDA’s “Voice of the Patient” aims to “…more systematically gather patients’ perspectives […]

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Presentation at 2017 British Society for Rheumatology

For those attending the British Society for Rheumatology Annual Meeting in Birmingham, England, I will be giving a podium presentation on Wednesday, April 26 at 12pm BST titled “Economic Burden of Rheumatoid Arthritis is Higher for Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibody-Positive Patients.”  Come by Hall 6 to check it out along with other presentations in the Clinical and […]

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Applying Cost Effectiveness Analysis to all Health Care Interventions

That is the topic of a Health Affairs blog post published today by James Baumgarder and Peter Neumann.  An excerpt is below. Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is an important tool for assessing and pointing the way toward better health care efficiency. The number of published CEAs on health care interventions has blossomed, averaging 34 per year […]

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Orphan Medical Products

Should health insurers cover orphan drugs?  Although the clear answer appears to be yes, the issue is tricky.  An orphan drug is one which treats a limited number of people.  In Europe, this designation generally applies to patients with a disease with an overall prevalence between 5 and 10,000 individuals. In order to incentivize innovators […]

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Patient Engagement in Cost Effectiveness Research

Cost effectiveness research aims to determine if the benefits of a treatment outweigh the cost.  But which benefits should be included?  How should we weight improvements in different outcomes?  What data and methods need to be used to measure benefits and costs? These are questions that academics typically think of as within the domain of […]

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What is the value of a QALY?

Many new treatments deliver significant benefits to patients.  In many cases, however, the new treatments may be more expensive.  How do we know if a treatment is worth the cost? Cost effectiveness analysis helps us answer this question.  Cost is fairly easy to calculate but benefits are more complicated.  A treatment could extend a person’s […]

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Do pharmaceuticals have value to healthy people?

Value-based pricing has become all the rage of late among health policy wonks. Medicare aims to tie 90% of reimbursement to some measure of value by 2018. The AMA has endorsed value-based pricing for pharmaceuticals. Organizations such as IVI and ICER propose different approaches for measuring value as well. Typically, value is measured as the […]

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Adding the patient perspective to health technology assessment

Health technology assessments (HTAs) aim to measure the cost effectiveness of a given treatment or set of treatments for a specific patient populations.  Often, these assessments are conducted from the point of view of the payer–either a national health system or the individual insurer perspective.  This payer focused perspective can often focus largely on treatment costs rather […]

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Extended Cost Effectiveness Analysis

Cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) examines whether treatment benefits outweight treatment costs on average for a given patient population. A 2016 paper by Verguet, Kim and Jamison examine the concept of extended cost effectiveness analysis (ECEA) which applies cost effectiveness methodologies to health care policies. The policies are evaluated over 4 domains: (1) health gains; (2) […]

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Should cost-effectiveness analysis ignore the price of the drug?

Cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) aims to examine whether the benefits of a treatment outweigh the costs.  However, whenever one is conducting a CEA a key question is benefits to whom and costs to whom.  For instance, a modestly efficacious  drug may be cost effective from the patient’s perspective if all or most costs are covered by insurance. […]

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