Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for the 'Innovation' Category

Understanding The Value Of Innovations In Medicine

Health Affairs is holding an interesting event in September on “Understanding The Value Of Innovations In Medicine” at the National Press Club. They describe the event as follows: Value” is at the center of discussions of payment and policy, but value has different definitions and meanings reflecting the diversity of stakeholders in the healthcare system. […]

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Innovation in small markets

The introduction of new treatment technologies typically occurs where there is a large market.  A lot of innovations are developed to treat disease that affect a large number of people in the developed world because the financial returns are large.  It is less likely to observe innovation in the treatment of rare diseases or diseases […]

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Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance

O’Neill Commission has identified a number of recommendations to tackling drug-resistant infections. Seth Seabury and Neeraj Sood have their own thoughts on how to incentivize the development of antibiotics to fight antimicrobial resistance (AMR) which they describe in an interesting article in the Health Affairs blog. They write: The US patent system incentivizes innovation by […]

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Why aren’t there more cures?

The answer is money, reimbursement, and incentives.  Treating chronic disease gives innovators payoff over a long period of time.  If innovators created a cure for that disease, they could of course charge the net present value of this same stream of payments.  Health plans, patients and the media, however, are often shocked at the high sticker […]

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Supply side health reform

Alex Tabarrok of Marginal Revolution notes that designing a health care system that focuses on benefits to consumers and is important, but one should not ignore how any health care system design affects the supply of health care, in particular incentives to create innovative goods and services. By greater spending on medical research, I mean not […]

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Quotation of the Day: Innovation

“Creativity is thinking up new things. Innovation is doing new things.” Thomas Leavitt.

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Does tort reform harm innovation?

The answer appears to be yes according to an NBER working paper by Galasso and Luo: We find that, on average, laws that limit the liability exposure of healthcare providers are associated with a significant reduction in medical device patenting and that the effect is predominantly driven by innovators located in the states passing the […]

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The Price of Everything and the Value of Nothing

That is the title of an article in Eye for Pharma which interviews me about measuring value in health care.  The article highlights a number of issues related to value measurement, health policy and the healthcare marketplace. The article also describes the launch of the Innovation and Value Initiative, a broad coalition of providers, payers, patient advocates, […]

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Static and Dynamic Effects of Vaccine Policy on R&D

How does health policy and pricing affect investment in innovation? This is the research question investigated in Amy Finkelstein’s 2004 QJE paper on Static and Dynamic Effects of Health Policy. She examines three policy changes: 1991 CDC recommendation that all infants be vaccinated against Hepatitis B 1993 decision for Medicare to cover (without any copayments […]

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How we should pay for cures, according to economics

I have an article up at the Washington Post‘s In Theory blog titled How we should pay for cures, according to economics. Imagine a major medical breakthrough: a cure for Alzheimer’s. Imagine that cure not only would improve the cognitive abilities of the more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s but also would give these patients […]

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