Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for the 'Mental Illness' Category

Patterns of Adherence to Atypical Antipsychotics

A study titled “Patterns of Adherence to Oral Atypical Antipsychotics Among Patients Diagnosed with Schizophrenia” was just published in the November edition of JMCP.  This is work with co-authors Joanna P. MacEwan, Felicia M. Forma, Jason Shafrin, Ainslie Hatch, Darius N. Lakdawalla, Jean-Pierre Lindenmayer. The abstract is below.  Go check it out! BACKGROUND: Poor medication adherence […]

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The problem with managed care is…

Managed care, as the names suggests, aims to manage health care.  The goal is to identify high quality, low cost treatments in order to insure that patients get the best care while keeping premiums low.  While good in theory, managed care critics often contend that some of the stricter managed care policies reduce patient access […]

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Can long acting injectables save money?

Patients with serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia often struggle with medication adherence, due to lack of insight into their disease, medication side effects, forgetfulness, and a variety of other factors.  One solution to this problem is to use long-acting injectables or LAIs.  Whereas most antipsychotics are oral medications, LAIs are typically injectables that you need to […]

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Medicaid Managed Care and Drug Utilization for Patients with Serious Mental Illness

How will Medicaid expansions affect patient access to pharamceuticals? This question is particularly relevant for patients with serious mental illness. The answer is complicated by the increasing presence of Medicaid managed care plans. Increasingly, states have turned to contracts with Medicaid managed care plans in order to better control costs and reduce budgetary uncertainty. However, in […]

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Mental Illness is mostly costly condition in the US.

A recent paper by Roehrig finds that annual U.S. spending to treat mental illness is $201 billion.  This puts mental illness as the most expensive disease to treat. Previous estimates using data such as the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) did not have mental illness as the most expensive disease.  However, MEPS examines health care […]

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Transformation of Mental Health Care in America

Mental illness is a highly prevalent class of diseases with potentially debilitating affects. About 30% of Americans have a mental illness and almost half (46%) will have a mental illness at some time in their lives.  Examples of mental illness include schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety disorders. A paper by Glied and Frank (2016) summarizes the transformation […]

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The future of mental health?

Nature has an interesting article on how mobile technology is being used to treat mental illness. Estimates suggest that about 29% of people will experience a mental disorder in their lifetime1. Data from the World Health Organization (WHO) show that many of those people — up to 55% in developed countries and 85% in developing […]

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Mental Health Stigma

In this day and age, does having a mental illness still carry a stigma?  According to research by Prashant Bharadwaj, Mallesh M. Pai, Agne Suziedelyte, the answer is yes. Comparing self-reports to administrative data records on diagnosis and prescription drug use, we find that survey respondents under-report mental health conditions 36% of the time when asked […]

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Antidepressant coverage in the Health Insurance Exchange plans

The most common drug class taken among patients aged 18-44 is an antidepressant. Furhter, these relatively young and healthy patients are likely to be the ones who enroll in healht plans within the health insurance exchanges.  The question is, how easily can patients access information about antidepressant coverage? According to a recent RWJ report, the […]

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The Cons of Restrictive Prior Authorization Policies

Dr Dana Goldman, a USC professor and partner at my employer–Precision Health Economics–explains how restrictive prior authorization policies can adversely affect the care patients with schizophrenia receive. 

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