Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Archive for the 'Pharmaceuticals' Category

Medicaid Managed Care and Drug Utilization for Patients with Serious Mental Illness

How will Medicaid expansions affect patient access to pharamceuticals? This question is particularly relevant for patients with serious mental illness. The answer is complicated by the increasing presence of Medicaid managed care plans. Increasingly, states have turned to contracts with Medicaid managed care plans in order to better control costs and reduce budgetary uncertainty. However, in […]

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Money back guarantee

With increasing pressure on the price of health care services, a number of firms are seeking innovative pricing strategies.  Stat reports: Stryker, a medical device company, developed its SurgiCount system to accurately track these sponges. This March, it announced it is backing the product with a $5 million guarantee. If the system is used as […]

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Do physicians know whether patients are adherent?

Doctors have access to life saving medication for a number of illnesses.  However, the medication only works when patients take the drugs.  Are physicians able to determine which patients are adherent to their medication?  According to an article in JAMA Cardiology, the answer is ‘no’ for cardiology patients. Forty (61%) patients reported rarely or never […]

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Part B drug reimbursement

In the past Medicare has reimbursed physicians that administer Part B drugs–typically injectable medications administered in a physician’s office–at 6% of the drug’s cost.  The 6% aims to cover the cost of purchasing and storing the drug as well as administering it.  Because physician reimbursement is proportional to the cost of the drug, physicians have […]

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Are drug prices higher or lower in the U.S.

The high price of prescription drugs in the U.S. has received a lot of press in recent years.  However, are drug prices really higher in the U.S. than other countries?  Tomas Philipson makes an interesting point regarding U.S. drug prices: It is well known that free-market prices of branded drugs still on patent are higher in […]

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Value Framework Guidelines

In recent years, a number of organizations have developed value frameworks to assess new treatments.  These organizations include the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER), Memorial Sloan Kettering Memorial Cancer Center (Drug Abacus), American Society for Clinical Oncologists (ASCO),  National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), European Society of Medical Oncology (Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale). […]

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How does cost sharing affect drug utilization?

Any economist knows that if you raise the price of a good, demand goes down.  Thus, one should not be surprised to find numerous studies that show that increased cost sharing decreases drug utilization.  But how does drug utilzation decrease?  Is it along the extensive margin (i.e., the decision to initiate the drug) or along the intensive margin […]

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Orphan Drugs

How can policymakers incentivize innovators to invest in new treatments for rare diseases? One solution policymakers invoked was enacting the Orphan Drug Act of 1983 which provided a number of benefits–including lower tax rates–for innovators who created drugs to treat rare diseases. Was it effective? According to a paper by Miller and Lanthier (2016), the […]

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Off label prescribing: Q&A

The Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy has a great overview of some of the issues related to off-label prescribing.  Below is a summary of some key points from this article. What is off-label prescribing? Off-label prescribing and use can take many forms, such as use of an approved drug for an unapproved clinical indication, use at […]

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Can reducing cost sharing save money?

Typically, economists believe that subsidizing goods or services increases utilization and the total amount of funds spent on a good. The RAND Health Insurance Experiment (HIE) proved that lowering cost sharing increases total spending on medical goods. Although reducing cost sharing on all medical care is likely to increase total healthcare spending, subsidizing highly effective therapies can actually […]

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