Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Applying Cost Effectiveness Analysis to all Health Care Interventions

That is the topic of a Health Affairs blog post published today by James Baumgarder and Peter Neumann.  An excerpt is below. Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is an important tool for assessing and pointing the way toward better health care efficiency. The number of published CEAs on health care interventions has blossomed, averaging 34 per year […]

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What is the value of a QALY?

Many new treatments deliver significant benefits to patients.  In many cases, however, the new treatments may be more expensive.  How do we know if a treatment is worth the cost? Cost effectiveness analysis helps us answer this question.  Cost is fairly easy to calculate but benefits are more complicated.  A treatment could extend a person’s […]

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Cost-Effectiveness Analysis 2.0

High drug prices are in the spotlight. While expensive, many of these treatments improve patients quality of life and even extend patient’s life expectancy. How do you balance treatment cost and benefits? Peter Neumann and Gillian Sanders have a perspective piece in NEJM describing the findings of the Second Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and […]

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Adding the patient perspective to health technology assessment

Health technology assessments (HTAs) aim to measure the cost effectiveness of a given treatment or set of treatments for a specific patient populations.  Often, these assessments are conducted from the point of view of the payer–either a national health system or the individual insurer perspective.  This payer focused perspective can often focus largely on treatment costs rather […]

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Extended Cost Effectiveness Analysis

Cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) examines whether treatment benefits outweight treatment costs on average for a given patient population. A 2016 paper by Verguet, Kim and Jamison examine the concept of extended cost effectiveness analysis (ECEA) which applies cost effectiveness methodologies to health care policies. The policies are evaluated over 4 domains: (1) health gains; (2) […]

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High quality comparative effectiveness research

What are the best practices for conducting comparative effectiveness research in the real-world?  One proposed best practice guildelines are the Good Research for Comparative Effectiveness (GRACE) guidelines.  However, most studies do not follow these guidelines.  A paper by Dreyer, Bryant and Velentgas (2016) assembled 28 observational comparative effectiveness articles published from 2001 to 2010 that compared treatment effectiveness and/or […]

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Nothing NICE about ICER?

On it’s website, the Instititute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) claims that it is “…a trusted non-profit organization that evaluates evidence on the value of medical tests, treatments and delivery system innovations and moves that evidence into action to improve the health care system. ” A recent article in Huffington Post however, disagrees.  They make two key […]

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Cost effectiveness analysis Q&A

What is cost effectiveness analysis or CEA?   One definition is that CEAs–at least in the field of health care–measure the difference or ratio between cost of care and the benefits of care for a given intervention compared to an alternative treatment strategy.  The intervention could be a new surgical procedure, a drug, a behavior modification program or any other […]

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What influences NICE decisions?

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) claims that although cost-effectiveness is highly valued in its health technology appraisal process, it sates that there are other factors considered relevant.  However, no explicit weight is assigned to these other factors.  Do they matter? A paper by Dakin et al. (2015) tries to answer this question by looking […]

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Quality-Adjusted Cost Of Care

One of my paper (along with co-authors Darius Lakdawalla, Claudio Lucarelli, Sean Nicholson, Zeba M. Khan and Tomas J. Philipson) was published at Health Affairs.  The title of the study is: Quality-Adjusted Cost Of Care: A Meaningful Way To Measure Growth In Innovation Cost Versus The Value Of Health Gains.  The abstract is below. Technology drives both […]

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