Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

International Healthcare Models: Australia

Today I’ll be talking about healthcare in Australia.  Australia a rich country with 21.2 million residents, has the sixth highest life expectancy of any country in the world.  The review of the Australian healthcare system is based on the Australia’s Health 2008 report.  Unless otherwise noted, all dollar figures reference are in Australian dollars ($1 […]

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Health Care Around the World: Canada

Canada has a single payer system but the provinces have the bulk of the responsibility of running the health care system for their own residents. In order to qualify for federal funding, each province must meet the following criteria. Universality. Available to all provincial residents on uniform terms and conditions; Comprehensiveness. Covering all medically necessary […]

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Health Care Around the World: Germany

The most significant difference between Germany’s health care system and that of other countries is its use of sickness funds. All Germans with incomes under €46,300 are required to enroll in one of the sickness funds. Those with higher incomes can either join a sickness fund themselves or opt out and instead buy private insurance. […]

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Health Care Around the World: Switzerland

I have already written about Switzerland in previous posts (see Swiss Healthcare Sytem: Part I, and Part II). Still of all the countries with universal health care, Switzerland’s is the most market-oriented and merits discussion. Switzerland’s health care spending as a percentage of GDP is second only behind the U.S. (11.6% of GDP for Switzerland, […]

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Health Care Around the World: Great Britain

Great Britain represents all that is good and bad with centralized, single-payer health care systems. Health care spending is fairly low (7.5% of GDP) and very equitable. Long wait lists for treatment, however are endemic and rationing pervades the system. Patients have little choice of provider and little access to specialists. Percent Insured. ~100% Funding. […]

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Health Care Around the World: Greece

Greece has an employer-based health insurance system in which all Greek employers enroll their employees in one of the “social insurance funds.” Due to strict regulation by the Greek Ministry of Social Health and Cohesion, Greece in essence has a single payer system. For instance, the Ministry controls employee contribution rates, insurance benefit packages, and […]

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Health Care Around the World: Portugal

Portugal is similar to Norway in that it is a very centralized health care system. Despite the fact that Portugal ranks highly according to the WHO, there is widespread discontent with the Portuguese system. Most individuals in Portugal are insured by the state-run, single-payer National Health System. However, 25% of the population is insured through […]

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Health Care Around the World: Norway

All Norwegians are insured by the National Insurance Scheme. This is a universal, tax-funded, single-payer health system. Compared to France, Italy, Spain and Japan, Norway has the most centralized system. Percent Insured. 100%. All Norwegian citizens and residents are covered. Funding. The National Insurance Scheme is funded by general tax revenues. There is no earmarked […]

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Health Care Around the World: Japan

Japan has universal health insurance based around a mandatory, employment-based insurance. “The Employee Health Insurance Program requires all companies with 700 of more employees to provide workers with health insurance among some 1,800 ‘society-managed’ plans. Nearly 85% of these plans cover a single company…Most of the rest of the [health insurance plans] are industry-based.” Small […]

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Health Care Around the World: Spain

The Spanish have one of the most centralized health care systems in the world. Patients have no choice of provider and there is almost no cost sharing. Like most centralized systems without cost-sharing, there are significant waiting times for procedures. This has resulted in a 2 tiered system where 12% of the population receives higher […]

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