Unbiased Analysis of Today's Healthcare Issues

Health care to comprise 20% of the US economy by 2025

That is the conclusion reacted by CMS’ Office of the Actuary.  As published in a recent Health Affairs article: Under current law, national health expenditures are projected to grow at an average annual rate of 5.6 percent for 2016–25 and represent 19.9 percent of gross domestic product by 2025. For 2016, national health expenditure growth is anticipated to […]

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MEPS vs. NHEA

Many researchers use household data sources to examine a variety of hypothesis.  The use of household data has many benefits including allowing for more detailed socioeconomic information (e.g., education, income) beyond what is contained in administrative claims files.  One drawback of household data is that extrapolations made from household survey data may not match national […]

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History says bending the health care expenditure curve may not be feasible

Many health policy researchers talk about bending the cost curve; this means reducing the rate of health care spending below GDP growth.  U.S. health spending, however, has consistently grown faster than GDP for nearly a century.  Woodward and Wang show that this relationship is surprisingly stable over time, even after the advent of large government […]

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Health Spending Climbs to 16.2% of GDP

From the CMS Office of the Actuary: U.S. health care spending growth decelerated in 2008, increasing 4.4 percent compared to 6.0 percent in 2007, as spending growth slowed for nearly all health care goods and services, particularly for hospitals. Health spending growth for state and local and private sources of funds also slowed while federal […]

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